Monthly Archives: July 2017

The Birth of a Mother

By ALEXANDRA SACKS, M.D.MAY 8, 2017 Source: https://www.nytimes.com For most women, pregnancy and new motherhood is a joy — at least some of the time. But most mothers also experience worry, disappointment, guilt, competition, frustration, and even anger and fear. As the psychiatrist Daniel Stern explained in the 1990s in his books “The Motherhood Constellation” and “The Birth of a Mother,” giving birth to a new identity can be as demanding as giving birth to a baby. Dr. Stern showed that becoming a mother is an identity shift, and one of the most significant physical and psychological changes a woman…

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Motherhood on Campus and at Work

by Claire Lehmann Born in the 1980s, my generation has grown up hearing from our elders that gender is a fiction. “Men and women are the same,” my humanities lecturers taught me. “To romanticize motherhood is to do women an injustice,” we’re told. Parenthood for women, we learned, should be the same as parenthood for men. It should be optional, and it should be delayed. And if we opt-in, home duties should be delegated fifty-fifty, after some careful negotiation. This is the ethical, progressive way to start a family. Millennial women of a certain class have grown up internalizing these messages….

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More than money: How to make a marriage work when she’s the primary breadwinner

by W. Bradford Wilcox, @WILCOXNMP For today’s dads, having a wife who is the primary breadwinner isn’t always easy. Although a growing share of married mothers earn the majority of income for their families—slightly less than one-quarter of married families with children, according to the American Community Survey, it’s clear that some men in homes with female breadwinners find this new reality hard. Of course, working wives, who are contributing to the financial welfare of their families, are not to blame.  Traditional gender norms can make it harder for female breadwinner families. But when she earns more than he does, husbands and wives…

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From Wall Street Hot Shot to Wife and Mother

by Melissa Langsam Braunstein, @SLOWHONEYBEE Success at work offers a real adrenaline rush. Unfortunately, it’s typically fleeting. Marriage and motherhood, by contrast, offer more lasting satisfaction. Those are among the important life lessons Erin Callan Montella shares in her new memoir, Full Circle: A memoir of leaning in too far and the journey back. Montella was CFO of Lehman Brothers from December 2007 to June 2008, and Wall Street’s highest ranking woman at that point. Her memoir follows her through two decades of a high-flying career, an ill-fated first marriage, the public collapse of her career and a subsequent suicide attempt, as well…

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Like Mother, Like Daughter: Does Family Instability Affect Girls, Too?

by W. Bradford Wilcox, @WILCOXNMP When marriage breaks down, boys are more likely than girls to act up. From delinquency to incarceration and schooling to employment, a mounting body of research suggests boys are affected more by family breakdown than girls. As Richard Reeves, the co-director of the Brookings Center on Children and Families, recently put it, when it comes to thriving in difficult family environments, girls may be more like dandelions, while boys may be more like orchids. “In psychology, people used to talk about dandelions and orchids…but the idea is that dandelions pretty much survive whatever you do, and orchids need to be…

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Mother-to-child transmission of HIV data and statistics

Source: www.who.int > Percentage of pregnant women who received an HIV test in low- and middle-income countries by region, 2005 and 2009–2011 (BAR CHART) > Estimated coverage of antiretroviral medicines (excluding single-dose nevirapine) for preventing mother-to-child transmission in 20 priority countries in the Global Plan, 2012 (BAR CHART) > Percentage of pregnant women living with HIV and infants born to them who received antiretroviral medicine for preventing mother-to-child transmission, 2007–2011 (LINE CHART) Percentage of pregnant women who received an HIV test in low- and middle-income countries by region, 2005 and 2009–2011   Estimated coverage of antiretroviral medicines (excluding single-dose nevirapine)…

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The Effects of Bad Parenting on Children

Source: http://oureverydaylife.com/ by Eliza Martinez   Bad parenting can cause emotional issues in your child No parent is perfect and you’ll likely make some mistakes, both big and small, as you raise your child. This is just a normal part of parenting and isn’t likely to have lasting effects on your kid, as long as you work hard not to repeat the mistakes. However, consistently poor parenting can have negative consequences during childhood and beyond. Understanding them helps you make the best decisions you can for your child. Behavior Research at the Department of Education in England found that children…

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7 Really Good Reasons Why You Should Not Give Up On Breastfeeding

The liquid gold doesn’t just benefit your baby. It’s good for your health, too, moms!   by Rachel Perez   IMAGE David Leo Veksler/PIxabay You already know why breastfeeding is best for your baby. There are its undisputed benefits — antibodies that protect newborns from illnesses and cash savings that could have been spent on formula and sterilizer. But it’s also not a secret that moms get a lot of perks from breastfeeding. In fact, in the news today, a recent analysis of 17 past studies found that women who breastfeed their children for six to nine months reduce their risk of endometrial cancer by 11…

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TRIVIA: Mothers and Mother’s Day

Dada Grifon Published 8:30 AM, May 11, 2014 Updated 6:28 PM, May 6:28 PM, May 12, 2014 As we celebrate Mother’s Day, Rappler lists some interesting facts about mothers and this celebration. MANILA, Philippines – For this year, the annual Mother’s Day celebration falls on Sunday, May 11. This celebration is an intimate occasion for Filipinos, as most families reunite and bond for a fun weekend. Part of the tradition in observing Mother’s Day is the giving of flowers, cards and gifts or even treating mothers to a “day off.” Some settle for watching a movie or having a fantastic…

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How a Mother’s Love Changes a Child’s Brain

By Joseph Castro Live Science Contributor January 30, 2012 03:01pm ET http://www.livescience.com/18196-maternal-support-child-brain.html Nurturing a child early in life may help him or her develop a larger hippocampus, the brain region important for learning, memory and stress responses, a new study shows. Previous animal research showed that early maternal support has a positive effect on a young rat’s hippocampal growth, production of brain cells and ability to deal with stress. Studies in human children, on the other hand, found a connection between early social experiences and the volume of the amygdala, which helps regulate the processing and memory of emotional reactions….

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5 Unique Parenting Styles Around the World You Will Find Useful

by Jillianne E. Castillo Consider the Filipino tradition of “pagmamano.” From an outsider’s perspective, it may seem a little odd that Pinoy moms and dads teach their children to bend down and touch their forehead to the hand of an elderly. But there’s a deeper meaning to the gesture: respectfulness, love and consideration towards others.  There’s something to learn from “pagmamano” just like how there are quite a few parenting tips to take away from the way other parents from different parts of the world raise their children. Here are a few:  1. Japan: Where parents let their children ride the…

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Stop Letting Guests Kiss Your Newborn (Don’t Be Afraid to Say So)

by Jillianne E. Castillo IMAGE Philippe Put/Flickr   Kissing a baby feels natural to many people. But, mom, if yours is a newborn, we recommend that guests, whether they are close family or friends, keep physical contact to a bare minimum. Learn from this couple who is experiencing the painful aftermath of introducing guests to their new baby.     Mariana, daughter of Nicole and Shane Sifrit from Iowa in the U.S., had contracted a strain of the herpes virus (HSV-1), causing meningitis, an inflammation of the tissue that covers the brain and spinal cord, reported by news channel WHO-TV. She’s currently on life support, reported news…

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Raise a Child to Have the Ability to Stand on His Own Two Feet

by Ma. Araceli Balajadia-Alcala IMAGE Pixabay When we look around us, the world is full of stories of people surpassing pain and loss. The story of resilience is about as old as the story of human beings walking this planet — without resilience, the species would not have survived. But resilience is not just about surviving and getting through the day. Let’s take a look at what defines a resilient person. Independent People who are resilient know who they are and what they want. It’s a trait that helps them be clear about why they do what they do, and they are confident…

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Teen Pregnancy

http://youthproblemsinthephilippines.weebly.com/teenage-pregnancy.html OPENING STATEMENT In the Philippines, according to the 2002 Young Adult Fertility and Sexuality Study by the University of the Philippines Population Institute (Uppi) and the Demographic Research and Development Foundation, 26 percent of our Filipino youth nationwide from ages 15 to 25 admitted to having a premarital sex experience. What’s worse is that 38 percent of our youth are already in a live-in arrangement. TEENAGE PREGNANCY Teenage pregnancy is the condition of being pregnant of adolescence aged 10 to 19. Those who are affected are the girl herself up to the national society. The victims of teenage pregnancy…

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Pregnancy in the 1800s

By Amy Wilde Demand Media In the 1800s, a woman had a one in eight chance of dying in childbirth during her lifetime. Although pregnancy is the same biological process now as it was in the 19th century, attitudes toward and management of pregnancy have changed considerably over the past hundred years. For women living in the United States in the 1800s, pregnancy was an expected and often repeated life event, but it could also be very dangerous for both mother and baby. A Woman’s Place In 19th-century America, women were expected to be wives and mothers. They were defined…

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What Filipino Mothers Say: Disciplinary Practices of Mothers in Rural Philippines

Margaret S. Sanapo, Ph.D ABSTRACT Previous studies had pointed out that physical punishment accounted for the majority of child-rearing practices in the Philippines. This study explored the actual practices of Filipino mothers in two rural areas in southern Iloilo. The data were gathered from January to February 2006. It involved 80 mothers who had children aged 0-12 years old. A structured interview was used to gather data from these women. Results of the study had shown that 80% (n=80) of mothers had punished their children physically. The most common reason for mothers to do these things to their children was naughtiness (41%)….

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One in Five Women aged 15 – 49 has Experienced Physical Violence in 2013

Reference No.: FS-201412-SS2-01 Released Date: December 10, 2014   According to the United Nations, violence against women is an act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life. It encompasses all forms of violation of women’s rights, including threats and reprisals, exploitation, harassment, and other forms of control.   In its Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women, the UN General Assembly “recognizes that violence against women…

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Philippines Population 2017

http://www.worldometers.info/world-population/philippines-population/     The current population of the Philippines is 103,835,753 as of Thursday, July 13, 2017, based on the latest United Nations estimates. the Philippines population is equivalent to 1.38% of the total world population. the Philippines ranks number 13 in the list of countries (and dependencies) by population. The population density in the Philippines is 348 per Km2 (902 people per mi2). The total land area is 298,192 Km2 (115,133 sq. miles) 44.8 % of the population is urban (46,543,718 people in 2017) The median age in the Philippines is 24.4 years. Notes The Philippines Population (Live) counter…

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Birthing Beliefs in the Philippines

By Amy Wilde, Demand Media Many Filipino women put great care into their appearance while pregnant, believing that this will make their baby more beautiful. Traditional culture in the Philippines puts a very high value on the family — and motherhood in particular. The birth of a baby is not just a private affair for one couple or family; it is a culturally significant event to be celebrated by the whole community. In the Philippines, pregnancy, birth and the time period after is surrounded by a wide variety of beliefs, traditional practices and rituals that involve both mother and infant….

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Breastfeeding times two

While many mothers easily gave up on breastfeeding, here is a first-time mom who took courage to nurse not only one but two little girls all at the same time. Meet Anabel Dela Serna-De Jesus, 35 years old, and mommy to premature babies Alyssa and Eliana. Being a licensed nutritionist-dietician herself, Anabel believes that there’s no better food to her children other than breast milk. “Breast milk is known as complete nutrient or food for the babies. It is economical because we don’t need to buy formula milk, especially now that I gave birth to twins. It helps us save…

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American women are Waiting Longer than Ever to Become Mothers

Ellie Kincaid Jun. 15, 2015 (http://www.businessinsider.com/average-age-of-mother-having-first-child-going-up-2015-6) More and more women in the United States are waiting until they’re older to start having children.  The average age of women having their first child was a record high of 26 years old in 2013, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Vital Statistics Report. That’s an increase of 3.3 years since 1980, when the average age was 22.7. Most of the change took place between 1980 and 2000, when the average rose to 24.9. It stayed relatively stable around 25 until 2008, when it started climbing again to its current high: Business…

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Why Having Kids Later is a Really Big Deal

Ellie Kincaid Jun. 30, 2015 http://www.businessinsider.com It’s already changing families, lives, and economies.Flickr/ devinf The average age of American women having their first child reached a record high of 26 years old in 2013, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Vital Statistics Report. The average age of first-time mothers is increasing because more women are waiting until their 30s and 40s to start having kids and fewer women are having their first kids in their teens and 20s, the CDC report says. The majority of all births are still to women under 35 (about 85% of the total), but rates for all births, not…

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5 Filipino Heroines Who Changed Philippine History

  By Gaby Gloria CNN Philippines Updated 19:26 PM PHT Wed, June 7, 2017 Our female heroines shouldn’t be treated as footnotes or afterthoughts in history. Illustration by LAZIR CALUYA Manila (CNN Philippines Life) — When asked to give at least three names of Philippine heroes, who are the first people that come to mind? Of course Jose Rizal is a given as the national hero. And then there’s Andres Bonifacio, Emilio Aguinaldo, and Emilio Jacinto. Perhaps even throw in Antonio Luna thanks to successful historical film “Heneral Luna” (2015). The Philippines does not have an official list of national…

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How to Raise a Feminist Son

We raise our girls to fight stereotypes and pursue their dreams, but we don’t do the same for our boys. By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER and ILLUSTRATIONS BY AGNES LEE CreditAgnes Lee We’re now more likely to tell our daughters they can be anything they want to be — an astronaut and a mother, a tomboy and a girlie girl. But we don’t do the same for our sons. Even as we’ve given girls more choices for the roles they play, boys’ worlds are still confined, social scientists say. They’re discouraged from having interests that are considered feminine. They’re told to be tough at…

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Motherly Love Helps Children’s Brains Grow Bigger, Scientists Find

                      Nurturing support from a loving mother help a child’s brain grow bigger Credit: Getty The Telegraph http://www.telegraph.co.uk April 26, 2016 Sarah Knapton, Science Editor   Motherly love can help children’s brains grow at twice the rate as neglected youngsters, a study has shown. Although it is known that a nurturing, stable home life improves overall childhood development, it is the first research to prove that it has a significant impact on brain size. Children who received the most support from their mother’s before school were found to have more growth in the hippocampus, which is associated with learning, memories and regulating emotions. Crucially,…

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